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Wednesday, April 5
 

12:00pm

Difficult Conversations: ECTL Lunch Box Sessions
Today's political and social climate creates challenges for many faculty and students. Issues and opinions often come up in the classroom that we as faculty are not always sure how to handle. These lunchboxes sessions are designed to create a space for dealing with difficult conversations. We invite you to come join the dialogue and share experiences, ideas, and successes in dealing with various situations to promote a positive learning environment for all students.

Bring a bag lunch on any or all of the following dates from noon to 1:00. We will provide drinks.  

Speakers

Wednesday April 5, 2017 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Big Horn

4:00pm

Building Health and Just Communities for All: Why Equity Matters

Robert D. Bullard is often described as the father of environmental justice. Professor Bullard received his Ph.D. degree from Iowa State University. He is the author of eighteen books that address sustainable development, environmental racism, urban land use, industrial facility siting, community reinvestment, housing, transportation, climate justice, emergency response, smart growth, and regional equity.  He has testified as an expert witness and served as a technical advisor on hundreds of civil rights lawsuits and public hearings over the past three decades. In 1990, he was the first environmental justice scholar to receive the National Wildlife Federation (NWF) Conservation Achievement Award in Science for “Dumping in Dixie: Race, Class and Environmental Quality.”  Professor Bullard was featured in the July 2007 CNN People You Should Know, Bullard: Green Issue is Black and White. In 2008, Newsweek named him one of 13 Environmental Leaders of the Century. And that same year, Co-op America honored him with its Building Economic Alternatives Award (BEA). In 2010, The Grio named him one of the “100 Black History Makers in the Making” and Planet Harmony named him one of Ten African American Green Heroes.” In 2012, he was featured in Welcomebooks Everyday Heroes: 50 Americans Changing the World One Nonprofit at a Time by Katrina Fried. In 2013, he was honored with the Sierra Club John Muir Award, the first African American to win the award. In 2014, the Sierra Club named its new Environmental Justice Awardafter Dr. Bullard. And in 2015, the Iowa State University Alumni Association named him its Alumni Merit Awardrecipient—an award also given to George Washington Carver (1894 ISU alum) in 1937; and the same year he was honored with the American Bar Association 2015 Award for Excellence in Environmental, Energy, and Resources Stewardship.

His book, Dumping in Dixie: Race, Class and Environmental Quality (Westview Press, 2000), is a standard text in the environmental justice field. His most recent books include Just Sustainabilities: Development in an Unequal World (MIT Press, 2003), Highway Robbery: Transportation Racism and New Routes to Equity (South End Press, 2004), The Quest for Environmental Justice: Human Rights and the Politics of Pollution (Sierra Club Books, 2005), Growing Smarter: Achieving Livable Communities, Environmental Justice, and Regional Equity(MIT Press, 2007), and The Black Metropolis in the Twenty-First Century: Race, Power, and the Politics of Place(Rowman & Littlefield, 2007). Dr. Bullard is co-author of In the Wake of the Storm: Environment, Disaster and Race After Katrina (Russell Sage Foundation, 2006) and Toxic Wastes and Race at Twenty: 1987-2007 (United Church of Christ Witness & Justice Ministries, 2007). His latest books include Race, Place and Environmental Justice After Hurricane Katrina: Struggles to Reclaim, Rebuild, and Revitalize New Orleans and the Gulf Coast(Westview Press, 2009), Environmental Health and Racial Equality in the United States: Strategies for Building Just, Sustainable and Livable Communities (American Public Health Association Press, 2011), and The Wrong Complexion for Protection: How the Government Response to Disaster Endangers African American Communities (New York University Press, 2012).

For more information: http://drrobertbullard.com/


Speakers
avatar for Dr. Robert Bullard

Dr. Robert Bullard

Robert D. Bullard is often described as the father of environmental justice. Professor Bullard received his Ph.D. degree from Iowa State University. He is the author of eighteen books that address sustainable development, environmental racism, urban land use, industrial facility siting, community reinvestment, housing... Read More →




Wednesday April 5, 2017 4:00pm - 6:00pm
Central Ballroom - Streaming
 
Thursday, April 6
 

9:00am

Keynote Panel
Speakers
avatar for Dr. Laura Arrowsmith

Dr. Laura Arrowsmith

Laura Arrowsmith, D.O. is a physician and transgender activist from Tulsa, OK. Dr. Arrowsmith attended medical school at the Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences, and completed her residency at Oklahoma State University Medical Center. She is a member of the Board of Directors for the National Center for Transgender Equality. She is also a member of the World Professional Association for Transgender Health and has... Read More →
DD

Dr. Drew Brown

Dr. Drew Brown is a leading scholar in the area of race, gender and sports. He received his Ph.D from Temple University, and is currently a Visiting Scholar in African American Studies at the University of Houston. While at Temple, Dr. Brown conceptualized the nation's first annual race and sports conference, "Passing The Ball: Race and Sports,” which has become a leading conversation on the role of sports in daily life through... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Robert Bullard

Dr. Robert Bullard

Robert D. Bullard is often described as the father of environmental justice. Professor Bullard received his Ph.D. degree from Iowa State University. He is the author of eighteen books that address sustainable development, environmental racism, urban land use, industrial facility siting, community reinvestment, housing... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Alison Kafer

Dr. Alison Kafer

Alison Kafer is professor of feminist studies at Southwestern University, where she also teaches in the environmental studies and race & ethnicity studies programs. She is the author of Feminist, Queer, Crip (Indiana, 2013), and her work has appeared in a number of journals and anthologies, including Disability Studies Quarterly, Feminist Disability Studies, the Journal of Literary and Cultural Disability... Read More →


Thursday April 6, 2017 9:00am - 10:00am
Central Ballroom - Streaming

10:45am

Decolonizing Mental Health: Examining Approaches to Multicultural Counseling
This presentation explores popular multicultural frameworks and social justice issues currently debated in the mental health field. We will also examine approaches to deconstructing paradigms such as Eurocentrism and heteronormativity, highlighting potential tools for decolonizing mental health education and practices through a social justice lens.

Speakers

Thursday April 6, 2017 10:45am - 11:15am
Family Room

10:45am

Pockets of Prejudice? Examining the Geographic Distribution of Racial Attitudes towards African-Americans
Recent empirical research suggests that individuals with similar political and personality characteristics tend to cluster geographically. This session explores the possibility that racial attitudes are similarly clustered, including the presentation of preliminary data from a national sample, as well as discussion of potential implications for future social justice research.


Thursday April 6, 2017 10:45am - 11:15am
East Ballroom

10:45am

A World in Distress: What to do About the Global Refugee Crisis
Humankind cannot be well when vast segments of populations are displaced and living in limbo as refugees. This collaborative communications panel will offer participants a chance to work with experts to create an action-forward dialogue that offers up a response to the international refugee crisis at the community level.


Thursday April 6, 2017 10:45am - 11:45am
Warm Valley

10:45am

“Remembered Remedies for a Post 11/8/16 Era”
What are the real remedies that promote a healthy body, mind and spirit? The empowerment of a love for self and others are to be first in a world where humans are exposed to political economical interest. Let’s share insights of how healing and joyfully living could be our richness.


Thursday April 6, 2017 10:45am - 11:45am
Big Horn

10:45am

Improving Adolescent Emotional Health through International Collaboration
In Spring of 2016, middle school students (ages 11-15) from both the UW Lab School in Laramie, WY and the Milan Brozović School in Kastav, Croatia co-planned and facilitated an international youth summit that brought together youth from 9 different countries, including countries of the war-torn former Yugoslavia. These students will present together on the lasting impact on confidence and emotional health of this type of venture. In the words of students themselves, you will hear how this "magical idealistic dream" became real and changed the perceptions, capacities and lives of the youth involved.


Thursday April 6, 2017 10:45am - 11:45am
Central Ballroom - Streaming

10:45am

Nonconformist Dancers
A panel discussion revealing the conflicting perceptions surrounding professional dance training and health and wellness. This discussion will look at four hypothetical case studies depicting realistic health problems that dancers face. The topics of these studies include healthcare access, body image and weight expectations, and social rejection.


Thursday April 6, 2017 10:45am - 11:45am
Senate Chambers

11:15am

Adult Self-Reports of Biological Sex, Gender Identity, and Sexual Orientation from a Large, National Sample
Social science researchers need to begin to more carefully measure sex and gender. We surveyed 8,455 U.S. adults regarding biological sex, gender identity, and sexual orientation. We found higher endorsement of LGBTQ options in younger than older adults. We report our findings and discuss methodological implications for social science research.


Thursday April 6, 2017 11:15am - 11:45am
East Ballroom

11:15am

Examining wellness, burnout and perceived discrimination among counseling students of color.
A critique of wellness research is lack of consideration for factors, such as racial discrimination and prejudice contributing to the wellness of students of color. The current study assessed wellness factors among counseling students of color, and identified whether perceived discrimination is a predictor of wellness, stress and burnout.


Thursday April 6, 2017 11:15am - 11:45am
Family Room

11:45am

Lunch
Thursday April 6, 2017 11:45am - 12:15pm
Central Ballroom - Streaming

12:15pm

Health Rebels: A Crip Manifesto for Social Justice
Alison Kafer is professor of feminist studies at Southwestern University, where she also teaches in the environmental studies and race & ethnicity studies programs. She is the author of Feminist, Queer, Crip (Indiana, 2013), and her work has appeared in a number of journals and anthologies, including Disability Studies Quarterly, Feminist Disability Studies, the Journal of Literary and Cultural Disability Studies, Sex and Disability, and South Atlantic Quarterly. She has served on the board of directors of the Society for Disability Studies as well as of Generations Ahead, a nonprofit that worked “to expand the public debate and promote policies on genetic technologies that protect human rights.” 

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Alison Kafer

Dr. Alison Kafer

Alison Kafer is professor of feminist studies at Southwestern University, where she also teaches in the environmental studies and race & ethnicity studies programs. She is the author of Feminist, Queer, Crip (Indiana, 2013), and her work has appeared in a number of journals and anthologies, including Disability Studies Quarterly, Feminist Disability Studies, the Journal of Literary and Cultural Disability... Read More →




Thursday April 6, 2017 12:15pm - 1:30pm
Central Ballroom - Streaming

1:30pm

Exploring Health Information Technology and Digital Divides for Rural Residents.
Online health information, personal health information management and use of web technologies for patient-provider communication leads to improved health outcomes and reduced health care inequalities. This presentation explores the digital divides and potential health disparities rural residents experience in accessing these health information technologies. Strategies to address these divides are explored.

Speakers

Thursday April 6, 2017 1:30pm - 2:00pm
East Ballroom

1:30pm

Integrating the Other: Creating Equality for Refugees and Asylum Seekers in Germany
As refugees resettle in Germany, the nation considers the difficult question of integration, noting past failures and pondering new approaches. Based on discourse analysis and fieldwork in Berlin, this research investigates how discursive framings of the German Self and the refugee Other impact integrative processes and social equality in Germany.

Speakers

Thursday April 6, 2017 1:30pm - 2:00pm
Senate Chambers

1:30pm

Challenging social norms: Supporting the rights of individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities to healthy relationships
The Wyoming Institute for Disabilities is implementing the Friendships & Dating Program to ensure individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities have access to education about developing healthy relationships and sexual health. Participants will engage in discussion about the curriculum as it relates to social norms and attitudes towards sexual health.


Thursday April 6, 2017 1:30pm - 2:30pm
Big Horn

1:30pm

Transcendent Dignity and the Power of Hope: A Multicultural Approach
Multicultural Health combines objective and subjective knowledge. Each patient brings their cultural heritage, family values, and lived environment to their hope for healing. The resources of religion, especially Native American traditions, offer rich understandings of transcendent dignity. In other words, the patient can draw on healing power beyond their affliction, the Power that makes them "whole."


Thursday April 6, 2017 1:30pm - 2:30pm
Warm Valley

1:30pm

Linguistic privilege and monolingual ideology: Issues in access to and quality of healthcare services in the U.S.
This presentation will address the topic of linguistic privilege and a culture of monolingual ideology that can be found at the intersection of language, privilege, and healthcare, and how these issues contribute to oppression and marginalization of individuals in the U.S. healthcare system.


Thursday April 6, 2017 1:30pm - 2:30pm
Central Ballroom - Streaming

1:30pm

Activism Creates Community Legacy in Riverton
In 1986, Manito residents living in the South Park Barrio of Riverton, Wyoming were frustrated at the city’s neglect of their neighborhood. After various attempts to incite action among local leaders to address road conditions in the barrio, the residents took it upon themselves to pave the then dirt roads that ran through their side of town.


Thursday April 6, 2017 1:30pm - 2:30pm
Family Room

2:00pm

Using Graphic Novellas to Promote Health in Spanish-speaking Workers
Technology may provide a solution to addressing health disparities seen in minority populations. This study developed and evaluated a digital graphic novella to address the risk of noise-induced hearing loss in Spanish-speaking farm workers. Implications for using technology to address health and developmental needs of this population will be discussed.

Speakers

Thursday April 6, 2017 2:00pm - 2:30pm
East Ballroom

2:00pm

US Post Conflict Development Policy in Iraq
The US development enterprise in Iraq has left the country in a sectarian turmoil that is claiming the lives of Iraqi citizens daily. This presentation will explore reasons that the US has failed in its development undertakings in Iraq and propose solutions for adjusting strategy to ensure a more successful outcome.

Speakers

Thursday April 6, 2017 2:00pm - 2:30pm
Senate Chambers

2:30pm

'May I have the privilege...'
With this presentation I hope to help clarify not only what “privilege” is, but how wide of a scope it can encompass. I hope to make it a more inclusive term, applicable to a wider range of individuals, presented in a format that makes it more generally relatable and takes away some of the attacking “us vs. them” rhetoric that tends to polarize the concept. I hope to help try and bridge the gab that the term usually creates between being able to collaboratively work across boundary lines of “privilege” to mitigate the social hierarchies that it reinforces and the negative outcomes those hierarchies may have on a great many people.
I hope to address not only “white” (racial/ethnic) privilege, but also socio-economic privilege, gender privilege, language privilege, privilege due to sexual orientation or gender identity, religious privilege and privilege constructed around nativity and citizenship. I also hope to pose the concept of “privilege” in a more humanistic framework, which gives some of the power back to the individual who can then conceptualize the concept in terms of ownership instead of hopelessness.
I hope to help generalize the concept of “privilege” to a wider scope of social justice, which creates a sense of social inclusion and responsibility for all. Placing it in the framework of a national concern attacking U.S. ideology and creating a barrier to participation in the social “rights” for a larger scope of the population leads towards unity in belief of a better future and a stronger social network as a nation rather than a divided nation of those who have and those who have not.
As a country there are a lot of things that we do very well, however, there are many areas in which we set a negative example in a big way in a worldwide comparison. Incarceration, punitive punishment, distrust of government, social economic disparity, distribution of wealth between the “rich” and the “poor,” gender inequality, LGBT rights, disenfranchisement of racial/ethnic minorities, treatment of native populations, etc., are all ways in which we set a very poor example worldwide.
Knowledge is power and acknowledgment of these issues is the first and most necessary step in rectifying them. Ignorance and avoidance do not create a more sustainable future, yet we obviously have a society in which it has been made very acceptable to behave in ways that help to preserve an unhealthy status quo that harms many people in one way or another. Advocacy for unity towards a more empathic, knowledgeable address of issues pertaining to social justice is necessary if we hope to reach that future. The Shepard Symposium seems like a wonderful way to do just that.

Thank you very much for your consideration.


Speakers

Thursday April 6, 2017 2:30pm - 4:00pm
Union 3rd Floor Hallway

2:30pm

60-second Public Service Announcement (PSA): "Conceal and Carry: A Threat Against Young African American Men"
In this student presentation and PSA created in Synergy's Spring 2017 English 2015 "College Composition and Rhetoric II" class, we three students will show our short video we created in class last month.  Then, we will discuss how young African American males (wearing baggy clothes and a hoodie, for example) are inaccurately, culturally scripted as "unhealthy=dangerous" to society. We will also suggest that individuals who want to get a conceal and carry permit should have to learn more about the negative effects of stereotyping young African American males as part of their permit training.  And, we will touch on how this topic affects us all in Wyoming, in the context of recent Wyoming Legislative actions about conceal and carry permits on campuses and in schools in our state. 

Speakers
DL

Desmin Lewis

First-year UW student in the Synergy Program
TP

Tyrell Proby

First-year UW student in the Synergy Program
JS

Jerard Swan

First-year UW student in the Synergy Program


Thursday April 6, 2017 2:30pm - 4:00pm
Union 3rd Floor Hallway

2:30pm

Missing in Action: Nurses in the Media
In the fall of 1996, my mom Nancy Woodhull, was diagnosed with lung cancer. But she approached her death just as she approached her life — as a journalist and a feminist. She was founding editor of USA Today and the cofounder of the Women, Men and Media Project, which studied women’s portrayal and involvement in the media. She received comprehensive nursing care throughout her battle with cancer. And she realized the nurses, many of whom were women, were the ones on the pulse of what was happening in healthcare, not the white male doctors in lab coats often featured in stories. She became concerned about the lack of media coverage of nurses, and so on her deathbed she devised a survey to determine how the media portrays nurses. After my mom died in 1997, the project commissioned by Sigma Theta Tau International was carried out in her honor and titled the Woodhull Study on Nursing and the Media in her honor. 2017 marks that study’s 20th year.

The outcomes showed overwhelming that nurses are virtually invisible in media coverage of health care. In the publications studies, nurses were referenced in only 4% of articles related to health care. That study was then used to challenge media outlets to engage nurses, and was used as a tool to empower nurses to speak up.

This presentation will give an overview of the project, share insights on how data based projects can be a tool for change, and also offer information on an update to the study happening in 2017.

Speakers

Thursday April 6, 2017 2:30pm - 4:00pm
Union 3rd Floor Hallway

2:30pm

Nordic Skiing and Climate Change
This is an experiential, action-oriented and integrated class that aims to provide a learning environment in which students explore the intersections of climate change and Nordic ski racing in any way she/he chooses. Students proposed a project of their choosing and determined the best way to present this project. Throughout this course students traveled to compete in the World University Games as well as regionally and nationally while at the same time engaging in immersive learning about the impacts of climate change on nordic skiing. They contextualized their learning to the abroad region and collected on-site data, ideas and observations to address the class objectives.


Thursday April 6, 2017 2:30pm - 4:00pm
Union 3rd Floor Hallway

2:30pm

Self-Monitoring: A Patient-Driven Communication Tool to Humanize the Symptom-Reporting Experience
This study was funded, in part, by a University of Wyoming Faculty Grant-In-Aid.


Thursday April 6, 2017 2:30pm - 4:00pm
Union 3rd Floor Hallway

2:30pm

Supporting Native American Health: Dichotomies Inherent in Nurses’ Perspectives of Leadership and Nursing Care
Background. The purpose of this study was to examine nurse leadership related to nursing care of Native Americans. The need for nurse leadership development emerged as a priority during the Growing Resilience Phase I Pilot project on Wind River Indian Reservation (WRIR). Institute of Medicine reports have charged health professionals to reduce health disparities through improved cultural competence and have charged nurses specifically with increasing leadership opportunities at all levels of nursing practice. Advances in nursing science and its contribution to eliminating health disparities and improving Native American health hinge on building nurse leadership and improving cultural competency. Nurses are in a unique position to enhance their leadership contributions for the purpose of improving health and healthcare. Nurses serve in a variety of community settings and healthcare facilities and are trained in individual, family and community health, therapeutic relationship development, and leadership. Nurses offer a holistic approach to patient care, focus on wellness rather than illness, and have training in health promotion.

Method. A descriptive-qualitative methodology was used. Phone interviews were conducted with 11 native and non-native nurses employed by public and private agencies that serve Native Americans on WRIR. Participants were asked semi-structured questions regarding perspectives of patient/nurse relationships, attitudes and values, and nurse leadership. A pseudonym was selected by each participant and was used during the interview, data transcription, and data analysis processes. Thematic analysis involved constant-comparison through the examination of (a) similarities and differences and (b) relationships between concepts. Note that Native American perspectives of their relationships with nurses has been sought in a separately-funded project.

Results. Participants were of varying ages, gender, and educational preparation. Two interrelated themes were identified that revealed dichotomies in nurses’ perspectives: (1) Contextual Dichotomy: Shared Patient-Nurse Values versus External Forces and (2) Relational Dichotomy: Patient-Centered versus Stereotype-Driven Care. Theme 1 described the contextual factors that influence patient care. Shared values of Native American patients and nurses (e.g. holism, respect, trust, caring, and family) were discussed as essential to therapeutic relationship development, which is at the heart of effective nursing care and nurse leadership. At the same time, the shared values may contrast with external forces that undermine relationship development. External forces were described as unsupportive work environments within healthcare settings and systems, racial tension, poverty, high rates of chronic disease, and the extent of nurse education and experience in the provision of culturally-competent care. Theme 2 described participant commitment to the therapeutic relationship and patient-centered care. Participants described the importance of understanding and meeting the unique needs of each patient and family, but also advocating on their behalf. Yet, this commitment was challenged by stereotypes of Native Americans exacerbated by the heretofore-mentioned external forces. This was evidenced by a lack of regard for the Native American patient rather than acceptance and appreciation under specific circumstances.

Conclusion. Nurses function in these dichotomous realities, struggling at times to meet personal and professional expectations.

Funding was provided, in part, by INBRE in collaboration with Dr. Porter, PI for the Growing Resilience Phase II project.


Thursday April 6, 2017 2:30pm - 4:00pm
Union 3rd Floor Hallway

2:30pm

The Exclusive Outdoors
So often outdoor activity is equated with health and wellness. We are told to take a walk, go for a hike, get some fresh air. As a single mom, who has two incredible and very active children who love to be outside, I made a decision to be more active. This summer, when my kids wanted to ride their razor scooters, I looked for a razor scooter to ride with them. They don’t make them for people my weight, but I took a chance and got one anyways, and so far so good. Before too long the seasons changed and we were eagerly anticipating snow. My kids have all the necessary gear to withstand the cold, snow pants, gloves, hats, baklavas, snow boots, scarves, you name and it they have it. It occurred to me my first day out with them, I did not have any of the gear I needed to be outside playing in the snow with them. Meanwhile, my parents moved and found the cross country skis I had stored at their house in college, and promptly forgot in the intervening decade and a half. As I transported the skis in my car, my son asked if he could try them out. In the persistent manner of 4 year olds, he continued to ask to ski over the next several weeks. This prompted me to get serious trying to locate winter gear in my size. It doesn’t exist. I was lucky to find some men’s layers, because apparently it is acknowledged that men are generally bigger. However, there is nothing for women at all in my size. My personal solution to this problem is a combination of truly ugly men’s base layers and custom designed and made outerwear. I acknowledge my solution works because I have the resources and determination to make it work, but I am paying more than twice what it would cost anyone else for the gear I have. Moreover, not everyone has the resources available to have custom gear made. How is it then in a country plagued by an obesity epidemic, that the people who could most use time outside and reconnecting with the outdoors have an invisible barrier to overcome? A barrier that is based on the size you are coupled with industry deep stereotypes and assumptions about your capabilities and interests.


Thursday April 6, 2017 2:30pm - 4:00pm
Union 3rd Floor Hallway

2:30pm

The Pursuit of Happiness: Determining the Ideal Time Point for Enriching Kombucha with Psychobiotics
The Albany County Downtown Clinic (DTC), based in Laramie, encounters many patients struggling with diseases like obesity, chronic pain, and psychological disorders. The most common of these psychological disorders are depression and anxiety (Anne Marie Hart, 2016). Recent research shows that particular probiotics work as adjuvants with already known medications for anxiety and depression, in order to improve communication between the gut and the brain (Pirbaglou et al. 2016). This research addresses the question of how to successfully brew kombucha, a fermented probiotic drink, with additive microbes, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Lactobacillus helveticus, and Bifidobacterium longum, which have all been associated with positive communication between the gut microbiota and the brain; ultimately, balancing mood (Zhou et al. 2015). Although a probiotic pill containing Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Lactobacillus helveticus, and Bifidobacterium longum exists which is called Essential Probiotics, an easy to make and affordable food product that contains these probiotics does not. In fact, after searching PubMed, there are no articles that have been found that augment kombucha with these specific probiotics, making this a novel idea. Thus, the Microbiology Capstone Fall 2016 semester class designed to augment the existing SCOBY (symbiotic culture of bacteria and yeast) of kombucha by adding a mood enhancing probiotic pill that already exists on the market. The kombucha was augmented with psychobiotics: Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Lactobacillus helveticus, and Bifidobacterium longum, all contained within the mood enhancing probiotic pill. Psychobiotics are defined as live organisms that provide health benefits in patients suffering from psychiatric illness (Tang et al. 2014). In order to assess this, the microbiology techniques of isolation, enumeration, and quantitative comparison were used. Once a psychobiotic kombucha was generated in the laboratory, the psychobiotics were isolated from the drink by using selective media, and later enumerated. A control kombucha was also brewed in the laboratory and characterized by pH and overall taste. Finally, the control characterization of kombucha was later compared to the psychobiotic kombucha. Although the psychobiotics did not grow to an efficacious and active titer in the kombucha, a fully functional recipe for kombucha was created. We are planning to pass on our knowledge to the DTC so that their patients can brew an easy to make, affordable kombucha at home. We plan to conduct probiotic education classes at the Downtown Clinic so that we can share the importance of probiotics and how they can benefit mood, and the overall wellbeing of patients with anxiety and depression.

Hart, AM (2016, September 21). Personal Interview.

Pirbaglou Meysam, Katz Joel, Souza Russell, J. de Souza, Stearns Jennifer C., Mehras Motamed, Ritvo Paul, “Probiotic supplementation can positively affect anxiety and depressive symptoms: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials,” NutritionResearch., 36(2016)888-889.
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0271531716301154.

Zhou Linghong, Jane A Foster, “Psychobiotics and the gut–brain axis: in the pursuit of happiness, “Psychobiotics and the gut–brain axis: in the pursuit of happiness,” Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment., 11(2015) 715–723.

Tang Fengyi, Reddy Bhaskara L., Sair, Milton H. Jr., “Psychobiotics and Their
Involvement in Mental Health”, J Mol Microbiol Biotechnol 201


Thursday April 6, 2017 2:30pm - 4:00pm
Union 3rd Floor Hallway

2:30pm

The Transgender Experience: Access to Healthcare in Rural Wyoming
We (Erin Clingman and Shawna Coleman) are social work interns at Wyoming Equality (an LGBTQ non-profit outreach for the state of Wyoming.) Due to Wyoming being one of the most rural and least populated states in the country, we find it powerful to create a visual representation of the many barriers to transgender healthcare access across the state. These barriers to healthcare include travel distance, lack of medical care options, competent practitioners, and weather. We have found these barriers to be unique to Wyoming, but hope that this research will serve as an example of other rural areas in the nation. Our intent is to show how difficult it is to acquire competent, inclusive, and necessary treatment for Wyoming’s transgender population.

A map of Wyoming will take up a large amount of space on our poster. Here, we will label the towns in which we know Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) is provided. Our poster will clearly show the distances people are forced to drive to obtain HRT. With information provided from the census, Transgender Center for Equality, and the Williams Institute, we hope to present these lack of resources in the most understandable way possible.

We find that our poster will primarily be based within qualitative research in hopes that our presentation will supply a real world relevance to anyone who participates. Surrounding the map, we will provide quotes from transgender individuals in regards to their own obstacles when accessing transgender healthcare around the state.

Furthermore, we realize that we are two cis-gendered women speaking on behalf of of the transgender population. We find it important to have representatives from the population itself present as we discuss the transgender experience. Overall, in our poster we hope to convey cultural competence and grasp the many barriers the transgender population in Wyoming encounters.


Thursday April 6, 2017 2:30pm - 4:00pm
Union 3rd Floor Hallway

2:30pm

Unapologetic
Quick review of my background as a nurse.
How is women's health viewed throughout the world?
-Developing vs developed countries
-Idealistic care vs minority care
Short synopsis of women's health in the U.S.
-Important players
-Important milestones
Current discrepancies in care in the U.S.
-Access to care (minority, immigrant, and refugees)
-Rural health vs urban
A review of current politics
-Affordable care act, the influence on women's health
-The age old discussion of abortion vs non-abortion sentiments
Conclusion: Where do we go from here, especially as healthcare providers?


Thursday April 6, 2017 2:30pm - 4:00pm
Union 3rd Floor Hallway

2:30pm

UW Preparedness to Address Student Veteran Needs

Introduction: It is estimated that by 2020 more than 5 million of the service members who served after 9/11 will have transitioned out of the military (U.S. Government Accountability Office, 2013). The college setting is the new frontline for many veterans (Zinger & Cohen, 2010). Currently, there is no data addressing staff and faculty perception of what Student Veteran (SV) needs are or barriers the University of Wyoming (UW) faces when addressing those needs. The overall goal of this research study is to assess how prepared UW is to address SV needs. Methodology: A cross-sectional convenience sample was recruited to capture individuals who may provide knowledge of how UW is addressing student veteran needs. A total of 114 faculty & staff members and 77 SVs (N=180) completed the anonymous survey. Results: Initial analyses indicate: both groups agree that training for faculty and staff on the SV population is an area of utmost need. Both groups identified space for the Veteran Services Center as an issue. There is also agreement that lack of transition assistance is a barrier.  Social acculturation is an area that SVs identified as a need whereas staff and faculty did not. Discussion & Implications: The results show that UW is supportive of SVs, but there are still barriers. The lack of understanding of the SV population is one of the greatest barriers that SVs face on campuses (Parks, Walker & Smith, 2015).  America’s veterans are driven to success and that drive does not end when they leave the military. They want to continue to be productive and accomplish their goals in a new way and for many; higher education is their new battleground.


Speakers

Thursday April 6, 2017 2:30pm - 4:00pm
Union 3rd Floor Hallway

2:30pm

Wyoming Pathways from Prison
Wyoming Pathways from Prison has four central objectives: [1] provide no-cost college credit, in partnership with Wyoming community colleges, to incarcerated people; [2] engage in valuable service to the state of Wyoming; [3] mentor UW students in teaching and leadership; [4] provide students with valuable real-world experience through teaching and assistance to the Department of Corrections. Taking these objectives into consideration, the panel would like to have a dialogue.

Speakers

Thursday April 6, 2017 2:30pm - 4:00pm
Union 3rd Floor Hallway

2:45pm

An Unknown Body: Things I have explained to my doctor through a year in transition
After a year in transition, I have had to explain many things to my medical team. This presentation will explore the strange reality that many trans people find themselves in of having to know more than their doctors and how that impacts healthcare outcomes both personally and systemically.

Speakers

Thursday April 6, 2017 2:45pm - 3:15pm
Big Horn

2:45pm

Reframing adversity as a pathway to strength: Applying concepts of resilience and posttraumatic growth for the promotion of individual and community wellbeing
The concepts of resilience and posttraumatic growth are critical pathways for the empowerment of individuals and communities experiencing violence and adversity. The presenter will define and offer research-based examples of resilience and posttraumatic growth with a focus on the individual and collective wisdom and strength that underlie survival and wellbeing.

Speakers


Thursday April 6, 2017 2:45pm - 3:15pm
Family Room

2:45pm

The Human Body as an Ecosystem: Expanding the Definition of Human Health
As fluid and dynamic as our wobbly planet, with a chemical climate that rages and subsides with hormonal storms and shifting landscapes, human beings are a superorganism – a walking ecosystem – carrying all of that with us as we go about our lives. The human microbiome is inseparable from human health.


Thursday April 6, 2017 2:45pm - 3:15pm
Central Ballroom - Streaming

2:45pm

'I Got My Shaking Up' :Physician Conflicts, Masculinity, and Traumatic War Neurosis in the Canadian Expeditionary Forces.
Shell shock became the first form of traumatic war neurosis in 1914. Soldiers traumatized by the constant gassing and shelling in the trenches of the western front began to suffer severe psychological and physiological symptoms that neurologists couldn’t explain. My presentation would discuss the marginalization that mentally ill soldiers suffered in a military medical system tailored for physical injuries.

Speakers

Thursday April 6, 2017 2:45pm - 3:15pm
Senate Chambers

2:45pm

Promoting Wellness: Responding Effectively to LGGTQQA+ Persons Who Live in Rural Settings
The stories of a person who is self-defining as gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, queer, questioning, and/or ally (LBGTQQA+) can be riveting and comforting. This presentation will offer findings from recent study (Mary Garland Early Career Fellowship Grant) of the stories of six persons. This will include dialogue and wellness strategies.


Thursday April 6, 2017 2:45pm - 3:45pm
Warm Valley

2:45pm

“Access and Success”: the concept of a double-edged sword? The search for a more respectful, equity-based classroom culture for ALL students, with or without disabilities
The 2007 Access and Success Initiative for college students in need shows some promising results but is not enough to reach its ultimate goal. The University of Wyoming is also faced with the need for improvement. A volunteer group of UDSS staff and faculty share ways to promote respectful, equity-based learning and assessment


Thursday April 6, 2017 2:45pm - 3:45pm
East Ballroom

3:15pm

Always Look on the Bright Side: Dominant Narratives of Illness and Health
Dominant American narratives about “appropriate” attitudes toward illness and health reflect unacknowledged privilege—demonstrated, for instance, through an assumption that health care access is egalitarian and a discounting of cultural and individual differences. These issues will be explored, and attendees invited to analyze a short health and/or illness blog themselves.


Thursday April 6, 2017 3:15pm - 3:45pm
Central Ballroom - Streaming

3:15pm

Healing and Thriving: Building Resiliency through Creativity and Reflection
The presentation focuses on how to incorporate creativity and self-reflection into professional work with students. This will discuss the ways in which resiliency can be enhanced to assist students in developing skills and working with traumas. The session includes multiple techniques and ideas for developing further activities.

Speakers

Thursday April 6, 2017 3:15pm - 3:45pm
Family Room

3:15pm

Trans Health Crash Course
A trans ally-inclusive look at the world of health and wellness from a trans perspective.


Thursday April 6, 2017 3:15pm - 3:45pm
Big Horn

3:15pm

Betrayal in the Family: Factors Associated with Elder Financial Exploitation by Relatives with Powers of Attorney
Prevention is the best approach to addressing elder financial exploitation (EFE). Our research provided insight into possible precursors in families that increase risk for EFE. Specific areas assessed included facts related to the elder, their POA agent, and their family system before, during, and after implementation of the POA.


Thursday April 6, 2017 3:15pm - 3:45pm
Senate Chambers

4:00pm

A Decade Later: Comparing Knowledge of Testing and Assessing HIV Awareness of University of Wyoming Students
In 2006, to increase detection, the CDC recommended that patient’s aged 13-64 be tested for HIV, regardless of lifestyle. In 2007, Kristine Young administered a survey that assessed University of Wyoming student knowledge regarding the recommendation. In an attempt to determine the impact of the recommendation on UW students, the same survey was re-administered in 2016.

Join Zoom Presentation: 

Topic: A Decade Later: Comparing Knowledge of Testing and Assessing HIV Awareness of University of Wyoming Students

A Decade Later

Time: Apr 6, 2017 4:00 PM Mountain Time (US and Canada)

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Speakers

Thursday April 6, 2017 4:00pm - 4:30pm
ONLINE

4:00pm

Outreach to the Isolated Learner - Distance Counseling at UW
Overcoming the stigma attached to seeking and receiving mental health is one of the objectives of this unique tele-mental health initiative at the University of Wyoming. Providing an important safe space is another, and we are proud to share our experiences with you at this year's Shepard Symposium.


Thursday April 6, 2017 4:00pm - 4:30pm
East Ballroom

4:00pm

The Role of Economic Empowerment in the Wellness of Marginalized Populations
Financial independence can have a strong influence on overall health and wellness. Survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault are likely to experience financial instability, a critical barrier to independence. Community members and agencies can support economic empowerment, which plays a crucial role in both preventing victimization and supporting survivors.

Speakers

Thursday April 6, 2017 4:00pm - 4:30pm
Big Horn

4:00pm

Clean water an elusive dream in developing nations: Lessons from International service learning projects in Kenya

In this presentation, I will discuss how lack of clean reliable water sources is a health threat to many communities in Kenya. Experiences from two international service-learning projects will be shared. In the Summer of 2013 a group of students and community members traveled to Kenya to help “bring clean water” to a community of more than 2000. In the summer of 2016, I will guide another water project to serve another poor rural community. 

Many rural communities in Kenya do not have access to safe drinking water.  Where water is available, it comes from unclean sources that are shared by both humans and animals. But many of these communities depend on rainwater for their water needs as well as growing of food and livestock.  During the rainy season, there is abundance of food for families and livestock. However, droughts are common in Kenya and many other parts of Africa “Water is essential to life. Safe, abundant water is vital to our ability to prosper and to fulfill our potential. Without it, we face a continual decline in our well-being, poverty and hunger, and increasing levels of conflict” (Chissano, 2010).

Without clean water come health issues such as typhoid, dysentery and many other diseases. Additionally, this leads to loss of productivity because of water-related illnesses. But  availability of clean water for millions of people around the world continues to be an elusive dream.  With global warming and climate change, droughts are becoming more persistent, and many communities are affected on a yearly basis.  This is a threat to global health because of  its potential to alter patterns of disease, water and food insecurity, affect shelter and human settlement (Chissano, 2010).  Although there is research that points out that humanity is causing climate change and global warming resulting in less water ( lack of rain/precipitation), these topics are ignored by many educators because they are considered “controversial.” In  industrialized nations that own industries that emit gases  that affect the environment and  that have been  subject to scientific research as possible causes of global warming due to “greenhouse effect”, discussions of climate change are controversial. But those in poor nations are the ones affected mostly by this changes, thus, this is an a social justice issues.

Therefore, in this presentation, participant will engage in discussions of:

  • Why availability of clean water is a health and  social justice issue ( mostly it is the poor people who do not have access to clean water)
  • Lack of clean water for millions of people as a global health issue
    • Possible solutions to this problem
  • Explore the controversy behind “global warming/climate change” and possible ways of bringing these topics into  educational and community discussions
  • Classroom strategies for handling and exploring controversial issues
  •  Some practical activities for teaching controversial issues.
  • Education for Global Citizenship as a process that offers young people-
    • new information
      • ability to critiques and judge its bias and reliability
      • analyze it
      •  synthesize it through a process of reflection on their own current views
      •  draw their own conclusions
      •  make informed decision
      •  take considered action on these controversial issues

References:

Bunten. R. & Dawson V. (2014). Teaching climate change science in senior secondary school: Issues, barriers &                 opportunities. Teaching science 60 (1).

 Chissano, J. (2010). Water and food security inextricably linked

Schuffler, M. 2017. Our health is inextricably linked to the health of the planet

Oxfam (2008). Global citizenship guides: Teaching controversial issues



Speakers

Thursday April 6, 2017 4:00pm - 4:30pm
Warm Valley

4:00pm

Buddha and the Breath
“Buddha and the Breath” is an innovative arts experience including music, poetry readings, prose writing, movement, and visual art in response to inspiration from human anatomical explorations. This program is inspired by the discoveries of an actual human dissection, in which the researcher discovered each layer of the body, like a progressive onion peeling, rather than finding and labeling structures with nomenclature in a distinct body region, often severed from the whole.


Thursday April 6, 2017 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Central Ballroom

4:00pm

Yoga: A Wellness Model Promoting Social Justice
Yoga is a holistic wellness philosophy dedicated to creating union between body, mind, and spirit and can be used as a preventative method of healthcare. Philosophy and practice of Yoga as a wellness model will be discussed, and participants will leave with practical ways to implement Yoga in daily life.


Thursday April 6, 2017 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Family Room

4:00pm

Let’s Talk About Sex: advice on living a healthy sexual lifestyle
Sex, the most taboo of subjects, often causes stress and discomfort when being discussed. Sex education often emphasizes the many health risks associated with the activity, but often overlooks pleasures and expressions associated with the act. In this session, we will discuss sex in a sex-positive manner with an emphasis on female sexual pleasure and consent.


Thursday April 6, 2017 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Senate Chambers

4:30pm

Digital Ethical Principles: Wellness without barriers
Educational systems have a responsibility to create inclusive learning environments that span boundaries. With the evolution of information and communication technologies, what does respect for people look like?  I will share how we came towards building an inclusive, feminist, anti-racist, transnational, decolonial, and queer digital ethical principles for current and future generations.


Thursday April 6, 2017 4:30pm - 5:00pm
ONLINE

4:30pm

More Bang for Our Buck: Revisiting Early Childhood Healthcare
With our nation spending above average amounts on healthcare and getting below average results, how can we use our immeasurable resources to have better long term outcomes? This presentation will explore the inner workings of traditional general pediatric practice with an eye towards community cooperation for improved health for kids.


Thursday April 6, 2017 4:30pm - 5:00pm
East Ballroom

4:30pm

Silenced in Session: The Struggle to Find Accepting and Affirming Counselors
Finding counselors who are straight and affirming as well as informed regarding the presenting concerns that men who identify as gay is challenging in many rural areas. This session will provide implications for practice gathered from the research conducted by the lead presenter.

Speakers

Thursday April 6, 2017 4:30pm - 5:00pm
Warm Valley
 
Friday, April 7
 

6:30am

World Health Day - Depression: Let’s Walk and Talk

World Health Day - Depression: Let’s Walk and Talk

Friday, April 7 6:30am-9:30pm

Half Acre Recreation & Wellness Center

Who: Free to all University of Wyoming students, staff and faculty

What: 15-Hour walk around the track to promote physical activity and mental health. Sign-up individually or as a team to walk for 1-hour (or more)! Prizes will be given away each hour and there will be a new activity to get you moving each hour if you are not walking.

Where: Walk will be located on 3rd floor track with several other activities around the building (see schedule for details).

Why: Physical inactivity is a growing issue in today’s society and can contribute to a number of health issues including obesity, heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure, cancer, depression and anxiety, and much more. Furthermore, physical activity and exercise have been shown to alleviate the signs and symptoms of many disorders and diseases such as depression. Exercise is a medicine that we all need a daily dose of




Friday April 7, 2017 6:30am - 9:30pm
Half Acre Recreation & Wellness Center

9:00am

Community Narrative Practice: A Revolutionary Practice of Public Storytelling
How can people talk about shame in order to help reduce and prevent suffering? Community Narrative Practice (CNP) methodologies use composite cultural stories to help people to talk about shameful subjects in a public educational forum. I discuss CNP, how and why public storytelling and open dialogue reduced stigmatization and created skilled cadres of community advocates in CNP projects in poor communities in Bangladesh, Haiti, Thailand, Uganda and the United States.

Speakers

Friday April 7, 2017 9:00am - 9:30am
East Ballroom

9:00am

Take Your Seat: Yoga for Activists
Sometimes we need to stand up and fight to institute change and collective evolution. Sometimes we need to take a seat. How can we know when or how to act? Yoga is a tool that offers practical ways to self regulate and hone our internal awareness.


Friday April 7, 2017 9:00am - 10:00am
Family Room

9:00am

Lifting Under the Cishet Male Gaze: Conversations on the Safety and Comfort of Female and Queer Bodies at Half Acre Gym
The weightlifting spaces in Half Acre gym can be particularly inaccessible for women, trans folks, and visibly queer people. Come share experiences of marginalization and discuss possible solutions. A primary goal of this session is to create a document that can be presented to ASUW for consideration.


Friday April 7, 2017 9:00am - 10:00am
Warm Valley

9:00am

Beyond Health Coverage - Health Insurance is Not Enough
Healthcare Navigators will host an interactive panel to discuss the power and influence of social determinants on access to healthcare, and healthcare itself. Attendees will be taken on a 'tour' of Wyoming, while addressing healthcare issues as they relate to: rural/frontier health, healthcare for formerly incarcerated individuals in transition, and minority health.


Friday April 7, 2017 9:00am - 10:00am
Central Ballroom - Streaming

9:00am

Indian Health
The importance of health care in addressing the serious plight of American Indian Health has been long established by federal government laws and reports where solutions and opportunities are presented. Congressional hearings have been held and Executive Orders have been issued and still physical and mental wellness is unacceptable.


Friday April 7, 2017 9:00am - 10:00am
Senate Chambers

9:00am

Risk, independence and 'good parenting': Deconstructing health and wellness myths for parents and caregivers of young children
In this era of "parenting experts", increasingly rigid conceptions of safety, and intense social media scrutiny, navigating parenthood and caregiving is a daunting task. The UW ECEC team will be deconstructing current notions of "good parenting", as they examine global perspectives on early childhood mental and physical health.


Friday April 7, 2017 9:00am - 10:00am
Big Horn

9:30am

Can Communities Affect Citizens Perceptions’ of Health Care as a Human Right? A Survey Study in Rural Nebraska
The Universal Declaration of Human Rights explicitly states the importance of health care as an essential element of human rights. While the relationship between health and human rights has received a significant amount of attention, very few studies have systematically examined rural citizens’ attitudes toward this matter. The case study of rural Ainsworth, Nebraska serves as an illustration of how communities might establish health care as a human right.


Friday April 7, 2017 9:30am - 10:00am
East Ballroom

10:15am

Traditional vs. Naturopathic Healthcare: Fighting Insurance to Find Wellness Without Borders
Wellness without borders should allow people needing healthcare access to any "reputable" care that will lead to healing. Most insurance restricts care to only traditional medicine, claiming naturopathic care is not "reputable." This presentation covers a personal ethnographic journey through healthcare, highlighting the rigid borders that exist within the system.

Speakers

Friday April 7, 2017 10:15am - 11:15am
Warm Valley

10:15am

SALLY Club: Youth Advocacy in Action
Students will be discussing the importance of having a safe space for LGBTQ+ teens and advocacy they have done at the local and state level. There will be a chance for a talkback at the end of the presentation.


Friday April 7, 2017 10:15am - 11:15am
Big Horn

10:15am

“Why do they do that? Don’t they know it’s not good for them?” A socio-ecological approach to understanding why people make health decisions, and how we can create healthier people and communities.
Why do people make decisions that place themselves and others at elevated health risks? This presentation will provide examples of how the socio-ecological model can be used for gaining a greater comprehension of health behavior and address social justice concerns, thereby reducing disparities and improving individual and community health.


Friday April 7, 2017 10:15am - 11:15am
Family Room

10:15am

Artist Talk about Gallery 234 Show, 'The Journey: Take a Walk With Me'
An art talk about the exhibit, "The Journey: Take a Walk With Me," which includes artwork from students in the personalized learning resources center at Indian Paintbrush Elementary school. Both artists will talk about their work, including the process of working with children who have developmental needs that do not fit within the parameters of "normal."


Friday April 7, 2017 10:15am - 11:15am
East Ballroom

10:15am

Transgender Discrimination and Equality
Speakers
avatar for Dr. Laura Arrowsmith

Dr. Laura Arrowsmith

Laura Arrowsmith, D.O. is a physician and transgender activist from Tulsa, OK. Dr. Arrowsmith attended medical school at the Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences, and completed her residency at Oklahoma State University Medical Center. She is a member of the Board of Directors for the National Center for Transgender Equality. She is also a member of the World Professional Association for Transgender Health and has... Read More →


Friday April 7, 2017 10:15am - 11:15am
Central Ballroom - Streaming

10:15am

Fighting Back The Perception
The whole purpose of our presentation is to examine who is featured in the media and how their portrayal influences the way our body image standards are formed and reinforced.


Friday April 7, 2017 10:15am - 11:15am
Senate Chambers

11:30am

Lunch & Awards
Friday April 7, 2017 11:30am - 12:30pm
Central Ballroom - Streaming

12:30pm

Radical Sports Men(tality): Cultural Ideas of Race, Sports, and Masculinity
Dr. Drew Brown is a leading scholar in the area of race, gender and sports. He received his Ph.D from Temple University, and is currently a Visiting Scholar in African American Studies at the University of Houston. While at Temple, Dr. Brown conceptualized the nation's first annual race and sports conference, "Passing The Ball: Race and Sports,” which has become a leading conversation on the role of sports in daily life through the lens of blackness. Dr. Brown studies a wide range of topics surrounding the culture and existence of African people, both continental and diaspora. As a scholar-activist, Dr. Brown has participated in several social justice initiatives. In 2013, he was invited to the White House as part of the Black LGBT Emerging Leaders program and participated in cabinet-level conversations as an expert on Black-male identity in sports. 

Speakers
DD

Dr. Drew Brown

Dr. Drew Brown is a leading scholar in the area of race, gender and sports. He received his Ph.D from Temple University, and is currently a Visiting Scholar in African American Studies at the University of Houston. While at Temple, Dr. Brown conceptualized the nation's first annual race and sports conference, "Passing The Ball: Race and Sports,” which has become a leading conversation on the role of sports in daily life through... Read More →



Friday April 7, 2017 12:30pm - 1:45pm
Central Ballroom - Streaming

2:00pm

Preparing Therapists for Treatment of the Transgender Population: A Training Guide for Supportive Care
The transgender population faces more injustice and deprivation than people who identify with their gender at birth. Client-specific programming for transgender people is largely missing, indicating the need for more supportive healthcare. The purpose of this training is to prepare healthcare professionals to provide supportive care for the transgender population.


Friday April 7, 2017 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Senate Chambers

2:00pm

Still In Pursuit of Equality: Why the Wage Gap Still Exists
Differences between the salaries of men and women have long been a topic of debate. Much research has been conducted to validate the reality of the gap between what men make per hour and what women are paid per hour in the United States. Currently, the gap nationwide is 80 cents on the dollar. The gap increases depending on age, race, sexual orientation, gender identity, education, and region.
Dissecting the reasons for the wage gap is difficult, because the problem is complex with many layers. Depending on ideologies, some even believe that the wage gap does not exist. Further complicating the issue is a lesser number of women and believers in elected leadership positions at the local, state and federal level.
The historic and current policies to address the issue of the wage gap have failed to effectively close the gap both at the state and federal level and there are more ways to make greater progress on this issue. But change is going to take more than a sweeping federal law like the Equal Pay Act to address the numbers. The solution will have to include federal law in conjunction with state based policy packages in addition to education and awareness campaigns to address systemic sexism in the United States.
The most significant causes of the wage gap according to research prove that the following issues are the most critical causes of the problem: access to education, affordable childcare, domestic violence, reproductive and family healthcare, occupation, sexism, racism, region and wage negotiation are each pieces of the puzzle defining and sustaining the wage gap. The problem is that no piece of legislation can solve all of these problems—it will take an entire portfolio of policy change and much of it will have to be achieved at the state level. Based on the robust research available proving the reality of the wage gap and the gravity of the causes, it is not necessarily surprising that there has not been a broad based movement—a real grassroots land swell—to pass a comprehensive policy package on the local and state level. Arguably, a reasonable comprehensive package has not been proposed and if it has, there is simply not enough infrastructure in government and organizations to carry it forward. Without a woman at the helm, timing is difficult to look at a path forward on the federal level. But perhaps a proposed policy plan to support that momentum on the statewide level can help bolster the movement on the federal level.

Speakers

Friday April 7, 2017 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Warm Valley

2:00pm

“Hearts of Glass:” storytelling and science for food and social justice.
Join award-winning Wyoming film producer/director Jennifer Tennican for a discussion about her current project, Hearts of Glass. Ms. Tennican will be joined by University of Wyoming faculty members Christine M. Porter (College of Health Sciences), and Michelle Jarman, Director of Disability Studies from the Wyoming Institute for Disabilities, both of whom are advisors on the documentary. After screening a trailer for the in-progress film and introducing their roles in the project, Tennican, Porter, and Jarman will, in conversation with session participants, discuss the powers of combining science and storytelling to support local food production, innovation, equity, inclusion, and community health.


Friday April 7, 2017 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Family Room

2:00pm

Flyover Country
Flyover Country is a screenplay about a drunk homophobic academic who must drive cross-country to deliver a speech or be fired from his job, but crashes into a sober gay tow-truck driver outside Laramie, Wyoming. He must rely on the tow-truck driver's help to get to his destination.

Speakers

Friday April 7, 2017 2:00pm - 4:00pm
Big Horn

2:00pm

Grappling with unconscious bias and navigating difficult conversations on campus
In this two-hour workshop and solutions-based panel, participants will learn what unconscious bias means, how to recognize it in themselves and others, and how to have difficult conversations about bias with peers, faculty, and even their own families. After learning about the basics, participants will then apply their learning to a few scenarios and get feedback from a panel of students and staff experts of various backgrounds. Participants will leave with tools to continue to having difficult conversations.

Speakers
avatar for Aparna Rajagopal-Durbin

Aparna Rajagopal-Durbin

A former lawyer, Aparna decided seven years ago to dedicate her work to supporting socially driven nonprofits and institutions attract and engage a diverse and inclusive base of people and cultivate inclusive cultures. Aparna has facilitated workshops on inclusion, equity, cultural competence, and unconscious bias for thousands of educators, students, and staff and has taught multicultural education at Montana State University. While not at work... Read More →


Friday April 7, 2017 2:00pm - 4:00pm
Central Ballroom
 
Saturday, April 8
 

8:15am

Safe Zone: LGB 101
LGB 101 is an ideal workshop for those looking to understand the LGBTQIA+ community, but who don't know where to start. The primary focus of this session is on terminology and language, stereotypes that surround the LGBTQIA+ community, and the effect socialization has had on us as individuals. Worksheets are provided.

Speakers
LW

Lindy Westenhoff

MA Candidate for Geography/UW Safe Zone Coordinator


Saturday April 8, 2017 8:15am - 8:45am
Central Ballroom

9:30am

SALLY Club: Youth Advocacy in Action
Students will speak about what the club does, why it is important to them, and what it has done for them. We will also discuss how the club has helped influence positive change for all LGBTQ+ individuals. SALLY Club has helped influence ACSD1 to include sexual orientation and gender identity in their nondiscrimination policy. We have also lobbied at the state level to protect all LGBTQ+ individuals in the state of Wyoming.

Speakers

Saturday April 8, 2017 9:30am - 10:30am
Central Ballroom

9:30am

In Which we Meet our Legislators, the Governor and a Supreme Court Justice...And What We Learned
On January 30th and 31st, almost 70 students from Lander, Laramie and Cheyenne came to the capital city and participated in a 2 hour citizen lobbyist training put on by Wyoming Equality The next morning we were greeted at the Wyoming Supreme Court by Justice Fox, who lead a conversation about the Judicial Branch and civic engagement.From there the students, their teachers, the WE social work interns and a handful of volunteers spent the morning at the legislature, lobbying their legislators on HB 135, HB 244, SF 153 and other bills they felt strongly about. The day ended with a lunch with some legislators and a meeting with the governor, Matt Mead, the State Superintendent of Education, Jillian Balow and State Auditor, Cynthia McCloud.  Our panel will discuss the positive and negative revelations we had engaging the potical process in the Equality State.


Saturday April 8, 2017 9:30am - 10:30am
Senate Chambers

9:30am

Safe Zone: Gender Identity
Gender Identity is a workshop explores some of the definitions regarding gender identity and gender expression, as well as various components of lived experiences from individuals who are gender minorities. In addition, this will help participants to understand how gender minorities have influenced LGBTQIA culture and American history. Worksheets are provided.

Speakers
LW

Lindy Westenhoff

MA Candidate for Geography/UW Safe Zone Coordinator


Saturday April 8, 2017 9:30am - 10:30am
East Ballroom

10:45am

Kaleidoscope: Humor and drama from the life of LGBT youth
Students will present two dramatic performances, one humorous and one dramatic to show a story of life as a member of the LGBT community. Between the performances, students will read poems based on their work over the year and the roller coaster of emotions they have conquered or suffered from.
The club will also present what their activism and collaboration and has produced to bridge the gap between their community and the entire school. They have worked on this by finding common ground in the area of mental health and the hardships that students have dealt with as teenagers no matter their gender, sexual orientation, race, religion, etc.


Saturday April 8, 2017 10:45am - 11:45am
Central Ballroom

10:45am

Rebel Health at Central High School
When discussing this year’s theme of Rebel Health for the Shepard Symposium, the conversation among Central High School’s GSA students was a little tentative and uneasy. Maybe our caution came from inexperience with health concerns. Maybe our caution came from the uncertainty of future health concerns. Maybe our caution came from the very personal, sensitive, and often stigmatized situations we have faced or could potentially face regarding our health. No matter the explanation, Central’s GSA felt very strongly about making this year’s presentation safe for the presenters and the audience. The students of the Central High School’s GSA have unique and diverse experiences and anticipations regarding their rebel health. To tell these stories and to protect one another, the members of the GSA will be sharing an anonymous telling of their rebel health narrative. Collaboratively selected excerpts of the stories woven together as a collection of experiences, frustrations, celebrations, hopes, and fears that represent the rebel health of Central’s GSA will be presented in video form at the 21st Annual Shepard Symposium on Social Justice.


Saturday April 8, 2017 10:45am - 11:45am
East Ballroom

12:00pm

Jason Marsden, Executive Director, Matthew Shepard Foundation
Jason Marsden, Executive Director, Matthew Shepard Foundation

Speakers

Saturday April 8, 2017 12:00pm - 1:30pm
Central Ballroom

1:45pm

Step Up! Bystander Intervention Training
The Step Up! Bystander Intervention Training Program teaches students, faculty, and staff the necessary skills to deescalate potentially dangerous situations before they turn worse. The training aims to empower participants to take a stand in situations involving discrimination, potential sexual assault, dangerous alcohol use, and even situations regarding mental health. The goals for this evidence-based and interactive training are: raise awareness of helping behaviors, increase motivation to help, develop skills and confidence when responding to problems or concerns, and ensure the safety and well-being of self and others.The session will cover potential barriers to helping, methods of helping, and resources that can be utilized to help.


Saturday April 8, 2017 1:45pm - 2:45pm
East Ballroom

1:45pm

Healthy Rebels: Stories of Skateboarding, Wellness, and Youth Empowerment
Four short films tell the story of a movement on the rise, through voices of youth that are finding a unique means of empowerment in the simple act of skateboarding. From South Africa’s Valley of a Thousand Hills to the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation and beyond, groups like Skateistan and the Barefoot Skateboarders are organizing, educating, standing up to strife, and thrashing through the imbalances of inequity. Come see their defiant smiles and hear the rattle of their boards, because these healthy rebels are about to drop in.

Speakers

Saturday April 8, 2017 1:45pm - 2:45pm
Central Ballroom

8:00pm

Pink Prom
100% free & open to all ages

It's time once again for Pink Prom! Pink Prom is an annual dance that is hosted by Spectrum at the University of Wyoming in partnership with the Shepherd Symposium on Social Justice. The goal of Pink Prom is to be a "second chance" at prom. If you weren't able to attend your high school prom as your correct gender or werent allowed to take a date of the same gender you will be free to do so at Pink Prom. All are welcome to attend this free event. Catering will be provided.

Catering is through Chef Without A Kitchen - here is a list of the menu, for those of you with food allergies or for anyone who just wants to know!

Mixed melon salad 
with mint lime syrup

Hummus and crudite 

Mini caprese sandwiches 
fre...sh mozzarella, basil, and tomato on mini ciabatta

Mini italian sub sandwiches 

Chili popcorn
salty and spicy chili seasoned popcorn

Shepard Symposium is also aiming to be as fragrence free as possible. In order to make this event accessible to people with chemical sensitivities, we encourage attendees to avoid perfumes and other scented products. Scented products include, but are not limited to, perfumes, colognes, essential oils, shampoos and other hair products, lotions, and laundry products. With the nature of Dances, deoderant is strongly encouraged however please be sure to wear a scent free formula!

Here is a good resource with further information on fragrance-free products.
https://eastbaymeditation.org/reso.../fragrance-free-at-ebmc

Saturday April 8, 2017 8:00pm - 11:30pm
Central Ballroom
 
Monday, April 10
 

6:30pm

I am Sam
7220 Entertainment and Abilities present I am Sam, showing in the Union Family Room with Closed Captioning on Monday, April 10th, at 6:30 PM. The movie will be followed by a panel discussion. Food will be provided.


Monday April 10, 2017 6:30pm - 9:30pm
Family Room